3D printed mathematics
“University of Melbourne mathematician Dr Henry Segerman says all language is about communication, Maths is just the same. Dr Segerman has found a special way to express mathematics in 3D printed sculpture art.
Henry Segerman earned his master of Mathematics degree at University of Oxford in 2001 and then a Ph.D. in Mathematics at Stanford. Using 3D modeling software Rhinoceros and 3D printing company Shapeways’ service, Segerman has made more than 100 sculptures.
3D printing gives Segerman huge amount of freedom in the geometry. See the photo below, he used 3D printing to create these representations of regular four-dimensional polytopes, the analogues of the 3-dimensional regular polyhedra.
The 120-cell and 600-cell are shown, which have 120 dodecahedral facets and 600 tetrahedral facets respectively. The left and right objects are dual to each other, which means that the vertices of one correspond to the 3-dimensional facets of the other, and vice versa. This is illustrated in the center object, which is simply copies of the two other objects occupying the same space, interlinking with each other.” ~ 3ders.org 3D printed mathematics
“University of Melbourne mathematician Dr Henry Segerman says all language is about communication, Maths is just the same. Dr Segerman has found a special way to express mathematics in 3D printed sculpture art.
Henry Segerman earned his master of Mathematics degree at University of Oxford in 2001 and then a Ph.D. in Mathematics at Stanford. Using 3D modeling software Rhinoceros and 3D printing company Shapeways’ service, Segerman has made more than 100 sculptures.
3D printing gives Segerman huge amount of freedom in the geometry. See the photo below, he used 3D printing to create these representations of regular four-dimensional polytopes, the analogues of the 3-dimensional regular polyhedra.
The 120-cell and 600-cell are shown, which have 120 dodecahedral facets and 600 tetrahedral facets respectively. The left and right objects are dual to each other, which means that the vertices of one correspond to the 3-dimensional facets of the other, and vice versa. This is illustrated in the center object, which is simply copies of the two other objects occupying the same space, interlinking with each other.” ~ 3ders.org 3D printed mathematics
“University of Melbourne mathematician Dr Henry Segerman says all language is about communication, Maths is just the same. Dr Segerman has found a special way to express mathematics in 3D printed sculpture art.
Henry Segerman earned his master of Mathematics degree at University of Oxford in 2001 and then a Ph.D. in Mathematics at Stanford. Using 3D modeling software Rhinoceros and 3D printing company Shapeways’ service, Segerman has made more than 100 sculptures.
3D printing gives Segerman huge amount of freedom in the geometry. See the photo below, he used 3D printing to create these representations of regular four-dimensional polytopes, the analogues of the 3-dimensional regular polyhedra.
The 120-cell and 600-cell are shown, which have 120 dodecahedral facets and 600 tetrahedral facets respectively. The left and right objects are dual to each other, which means that the vertices of one correspond to the 3-dimensional facets of the other, and vice versa. This is illustrated in the center object, which is simply copies of the two other objects occupying the same space, interlinking with each other.” ~ 3ders.org 3D printed mathematics
“University of Melbourne mathematician Dr Henry Segerman says all language is about communication, Maths is just the same. Dr Segerman has found a special way to express mathematics in 3D printed sculpture art.
Henry Segerman earned his master of Mathematics degree at University of Oxford in 2001 and then a Ph.D. in Mathematics at Stanford. Using 3D modeling software Rhinoceros and 3D printing company Shapeways’ service, Segerman has made more than 100 sculptures.
3D printing gives Segerman huge amount of freedom in the geometry. See the photo below, he used 3D printing to create these representations of regular four-dimensional polytopes, the analogues of the 3-dimensional regular polyhedra.
The 120-cell and 600-cell are shown, which have 120 dodecahedral facets and 600 tetrahedral facets respectively. The left and right objects are dual to each other, which means that the vertices of one correspond to the 3-dimensional facets of the other, and vice versa. This is illustrated in the center object, which is simply copies of the two other objects occupying the same space, interlinking with each other.” ~ 3ders.org

3D printed mathematics

University of Melbourne mathematician Dr Henry Segerman says all language is about communication, Maths is just the same. Dr Segerman has found a special way to express mathematics in 3D printed sculpture art.

Henry Segerman earned his master of Mathematics degree at University of Oxford in 2001 and then a Ph.D. in Mathematics at Stanford. Using 3D modeling software Rhinoceros and 3D printing company Shapeways’ service, Segerman has made more than 100 sculptures.

3D printing gives Segerman huge amount of freedom in the geometry. See the photo below, he used 3D printing to create these representations of regular four-dimensional polytopes, the analogues of the 3-dimensional regular polyhedra.

The 120-cell and 600-cell are shown, which have 120 dodecahedral facets and 600 tetrahedral facets respectively. The left and right objects are dual to each other, which means that the vertices of one correspond to the 3-dimensional facets of the other, and vice versa. This is illustrated in the center object, which is simply copies of the two other objects occupying the same space, interlinking with each other.” ~ 3ders.org