ONE COMPONENT – ONE MODULE – ONE BODY – ONE VISION
“A component, module, or even a complete, one-piece vehicle body produced in one single production process! Impossible? Current advances in additive manufacturing have brought what still sounds like Utopia one step closer to reality! The industrial 3D print revolution has begun. Once consumer printers for € 1,000 have flooded the mar-ket, industrial applications will soon follow the consumer hype. Reason enough for EDAG, one of the leading engineering service providers in the automotive industry, to give an idea of the revolution that might well occur in the automotive industry, and assess the status quo of additive manufacturing processes from today’s point of view.
At the EDAG stand in Geneva, the company will be presenting a futuristic vehicle sculpture “EDAG GENESIS”, which, using the example of a body structure, is designed to demonstrate the revolutionary potential of additive manufacturing. Including bionic lightweight principles, topological optimisation and load-conforming design strategy! In a roadmap, EDAG assesses promising technologies for the development and possible production of structural parts and modules in low-volume series.” ~ edag.de

“The EDAG GENESIS concept will use an example of body sculpture design based on the bionic patterns of a turtle, which has a shell that provides protection and cushioning while being part of the animal’s bone structure. What EDAG wants to make perfectly clear to the public with this turtle-supercar concept is that this organic-based structure cannot be built using conventional tools. And that it can be 3D printed as a single piece.
To understand which process could one day make this possible, EDAG’s Competence Center for Lightweight Construction studied the potential of many different additive manufacturing technologies, in terms of structural relevance, possible part size, production tolerance and manufacturing costs. The main technologies taken into consideration included selective laser sintering (SLS), selective laser melting (SLM), laser stereolithography (SLA) and fused deposition modelling (FDM).
Guess which one won?
Ok we’ll tell you. It was fused deposition modelling, as it theoretically makes it possible for components of any size to be produced, with no predetermined space requirements (FDM house building dreamers, such as Massimo Moretti, Enrico Dini, Behrokh Khoshnevis and DUS know all about that). EDAG envisions an industrial FDM system composed of many robots laying down the thermoplastic material in an open space. Using carbon fibre in the production process will make it possible to achieve the required strength and stiffness.” ~ 3dprintingindustry.com
personalfactory: Automotive industry is heading to very interesting place :) Though it is only the beginning of a long road 3d printing can drastically change the way cars will be manufactured in the future. This is so exciting ! ONE COMPONENT – ONE MODULE – ONE BODY – ONE VISION
“A component, module, or even a complete, one-piece vehicle body produced in one single production process! Impossible? Current advances in additive manufacturing have brought what still sounds like Utopia one step closer to reality! The industrial 3D print revolution has begun. Once consumer printers for € 1,000 have flooded the mar-ket, industrial applications will soon follow the consumer hype. Reason enough for EDAG, one of the leading engineering service providers in the automotive industry, to give an idea of the revolution that might well occur in the automotive industry, and assess the status quo of additive manufacturing processes from today’s point of view.
At the EDAG stand in Geneva, the company will be presenting a futuristic vehicle sculpture “EDAG GENESIS”, which, using the example of a body structure, is designed to demonstrate the revolutionary potential of additive manufacturing. Including bionic lightweight principles, topological optimisation and load-conforming design strategy! In a roadmap, EDAG assesses promising technologies for the development and possible production of structural parts and modules in low-volume series.” ~ edag.de

“The EDAG GENESIS concept will use an example of body sculpture design based on the bionic patterns of a turtle, which has a shell that provides protection and cushioning while being part of the animal’s bone structure. What EDAG wants to make perfectly clear to the public with this turtle-supercar concept is that this organic-based structure cannot be built using conventional tools. And that it can be 3D printed as a single piece.
To understand which process could one day make this possible, EDAG’s Competence Center for Lightweight Construction studied the potential of many different additive manufacturing technologies, in terms of structural relevance, possible part size, production tolerance and manufacturing costs. The main technologies taken into consideration included selective laser sintering (SLS), selective laser melting (SLM), laser stereolithography (SLA) and fused deposition modelling (FDM).
Guess which one won?
Ok we’ll tell you. It was fused deposition modelling, as it theoretically makes it possible for components of any size to be produced, with no predetermined space requirements (FDM house building dreamers, such as Massimo Moretti, Enrico Dini, Behrokh Khoshnevis and DUS know all about that). EDAG envisions an industrial FDM system composed of many robots laying down the thermoplastic material in an open space. Using carbon fibre in the production process will make it possible to achieve the required strength and stiffness.” ~ 3dprintingindustry.com
personalfactory: Automotive industry is heading to very interesting place :) Though it is only the beginning of a long road 3d printing can drastically change the way cars will be manufactured in the future. This is so exciting ! ONE COMPONENT – ONE MODULE – ONE BODY – ONE VISION
“A component, module, or even a complete, one-piece vehicle body produced in one single production process! Impossible? Current advances in additive manufacturing have brought what still sounds like Utopia one step closer to reality! The industrial 3D print revolution has begun. Once consumer printers for € 1,000 have flooded the mar-ket, industrial applications will soon follow the consumer hype. Reason enough for EDAG, one of the leading engineering service providers in the automotive industry, to give an idea of the revolution that might well occur in the automotive industry, and assess the status quo of additive manufacturing processes from today’s point of view.
At the EDAG stand in Geneva, the company will be presenting a futuristic vehicle sculpture “EDAG GENESIS”, which, using the example of a body structure, is designed to demonstrate the revolutionary potential of additive manufacturing. Including bionic lightweight principles, topological optimisation and load-conforming design strategy! In a roadmap, EDAG assesses promising technologies for the development and possible production of structural parts and modules in low-volume series.” ~ edag.de

“The EDAG GENESIS concept will use an example of body sculpture design based on the bionic patterns of a turtle, which has a shell that provides protection and cushioning while being part of the animal’s bone structure. What EDAG wants to make perfectly clear to the public with this turtle-supercar concept is that this organic-based structure cannot be built using conventional tools. And that it can be 3D printed as a single piece.
To understand which process could one day make this possible, EDAG’s Competence Center for Lightweight Construction studied the potential of many different additive manufacturing technologies, in terms of structural relevance, possible part size, production tolerance and manufacturing costs. The main technologies taken into consideration included selective laser sintering (SLS), selective laser melting (SLM), laser stereolithography (SLA) and fused deposition modelling (FDM).
Guess which one won?
Ok we’ll tell you. It was fused deposition modelling, as it theoretically makes it possible for components of any size to be produced, with no predetermined space requirements (FDM house building dreamers, such as Massimo Moretti, Enrico Dini, Behrokh Khoshnevis and DUS know all about that). EDAG envisions an industrial FDM system composed of many robots laying down the thermoplastic material in an open space. Using carbon fibre in the production process will make it possible to achieve the required strength and stiffness.” ~ 3dprintingindustry.com
personalfactory: Automotive industry is heading to very interesting place :) Though it is only the beginning of a long road 3d printing can drastically change the way cars will be manufactured in the future. This is so exciting ! ONE COMPONENT – ONE MODULE – ONE BODY – ONE VISION
“A component, module, or even a complete, one-piece vehicle body produced in one single production process! Impossible? Current advances in additive manufacturing have brought what still sounds like Utopia one step closer to reality! The industrial 3D print revolution has begun. Once consumer printers for € 1,000 have flooded the mar-ket, industrial applications will soon follow the consumer hype. Reason enough for EDAG, one of the leading engineering service providers in the automotive industry, to give an idea of the revolution that might well occur in the automotive industry, and assess the status quo of additive manufacturing processes from today’s point of view.
At the EDAG stand in Geneva, the company will be presenting a futuristic vehicle sculpture “EDAG GENESIS”, which, using the example of a body structure, is designed to demonstrate the revolutionary potential of additive manufacturing. Including bionic lightweight principles, topological optimisation and load-conforming design strategy! In a roadmap, EDAG assesses promising technologies for the development and possible production of structural parts and modules in low-volume series.” ~ edag.de

“The EDAG GENESIS concept will use an example of body sculpture design based on the bionic patterns of a turtle, which has a shell that provides protection and cushioning while being part of the animal’s bone structure. What EDAG wants to make perfectly clear to the public with this turtle-supercar concept is that this organic-based structure cannot be built using conventional tools. And that it can be 3D printed as a single piece.
To understand which process could one day make this possible, EDAG’s Competence Center for Lightweight Construction studied the potential of many different additive manufacturing technologies, in terms of structural relevance, possible part size, production tolerance and manufacturing costs. The main technologies taken into consideration included selective laser sintering (SLS), selective laser melting (SLM), laser stereolithography (SLA) and fused deposition modelling (FDM).
Guess which one won?
Ok we’ll tell you. It was fused deposition modelling, as it theoretically makes it possible for components of any size to be produced, with no predetermined space requirements (FDM house building dreamers, such as Massimo Moretti, Enrico Dini, Behrokh Khoshnevis and DUS know all about that). EDAG envisions an industrial FDM system composed of many robots laying down the thermoplastic material in an open space. Using carbon fibre in the production process will make it possible to achieve the required strength and stiffness.” ~ 3dprintingindustry.com
personalfactory: Automotive industry is heading to very interesting place :) Though it is only the beginning of a long road 3d printing can drastically change the way cars will be manufactured in the future. This is so exciting ! ONE COMPONENT – ONE MODULE – ONE BODY – ONE VISION
“A component, module, or even a complete, one-piece vehicle body produced in one single production process! Impossible? Current advances in additive manufacturing have brought what still sounds like Utopia one step closer to reality! The industrial 3D print revolution has begun. Once consumer printers for € 1,000 have flooded the mar-ket, industrial applications will soon follow the consumer hype. Reason enough for EDAG, one of the leading engineering service providers in the automotive industry, to give an idea of the revolution that might well occur in the automotive industry, and assess the status quo of additive manufacturing processes from today’s point of view.
At the EDAG stand in Geneva, the company will be presenting a futuristic vehicle sculpture “EDAG GENESIS”, which, using the example of a body structure, is designed to demonstrate the revolutionary potential of additive manufacturing. Including bionic lightweight principles, topological optimisation and load-conforming design strategy! In a roadmap, EDAG assesses promising technologies for the development and possible production of structural parts and modules in low-volume series.” ~ edag.de

“The EDAG GENESIS concept will use an example of body sculpture design based on the bionic patterns of a turtle, which has a shell that provides protection and cushioning while being part of the animal’s bone structure. What EDAG wants to make perfectly clear to the public with this turtle-supercar concept is that this organic-based structure cannot be built using conventional tools. And that it can be 3D printed as a single piece.
To understand which process could one day make this possible, EDAG’s Competence Center for Lightweight Construction studied the potential of many different additive manufacturing technologies, in terms of structural relevance, possible part size, production tolerance and manufacturing costs. The main technologies taken into consideration included selective laser sintering (SLS), selective laser melting (SLM), laser stereolithography (SLA) and fused deposition modelling (FDM).
Guess which one won?
Ok we’ll tell you. It was fused deposition modelling, as it theoretically makes it possible for components of any size to be produced, with no predetermined space requirements (FDM house building dreamers, such as Massimo Moretti, Enrico Dini, Behrokh Khoshnevis and DUS know all about that). EDAG envisions an industrial FDM system composed of many robots laying down the thermoplastic material in an open space. Using carbon fibre in the production process will make it possible to achieve the required strength and stiffness.” ~ 3dprintingindustry.com
personalfactory: Automotive industry is heading to very interesting place :) Though it is only the beginning of a long road 3d printing can drastically change the way cars will be manufactured in the future. This is so exciting !

ONE COMPONENT – ONE MODULE – ONE BODY – ONE VISION

A component, module, or even a complete, one-piece vehicle body produced in one single production process! Impossible? Current advances in additive manufacturing have brought what still sounds like Utopia one step closer to reality! The industrial 3D print revolution has begun. Once consumer printers for € 1,000 have flooded the mar-ket, industrial applications will soon follow the consumer hype. Reason enough for EDAG, one of the leading engineering service providers in the automotive industry, to give an idea of the revolution that might well occur in the automotive industry, and assess the status quo of additive manufacturing processes from today’s point of view.

At the EDAG stand in Geneva, the company will be presenting a futuristic vehicle sculpture “EDAG GENESIS”, which, using the example of a body structure, is designed to demonstrate the revolutionary potential of additive manufacturing. Including bionic lightweight principles, topological optimisation and load-conforming design strategy! In a roadmap, EDAG assesses promising technologies for the development and possible production of structural parts and modules in low-volume series.” ~ edag.de

The EDAG GENESIS concept will use an example of body sculpture design based on the bionic patterns of a turtle, which has a shell that provides protection and cushioning while being part of the animal’s bone structure. What EDAG wants to make perfectly clear to the public with this turtle-supercar concept is that this organic-based structure cannot be built using conventional tools. And that it can be 3D printed as a single piece.

To understand which process could one day make this possible, EDAG’s Competence Center for Lightweight Construction studied the potential of many different additive manufacturing technologies, in terms of structural relevance, possible part size, production tolerance and manufacturing costs. The main technologies taken into consideration included selective laser sintering (SLS), selective laser melting (SLM), laser stereolithography (SLA) and fused deposition modelling (FDM).

Guess which one won?

Ok we’ll tell you. It was fused deposition modelling, as it theoretically makes it possible for components of any size to be produced, with no predetermined space requirements (FDM house building dreamers, such as Massimo Moretti, Enrico Dini, Behrokh Khoshnevis and DUS know all about that). EDAG envisions an industrial FDM system composed of many robots laying down the thermoplastic material in an open space. Using carbon fibre in the production process will make it possible to achieve the required strength and stiffness.” ~ 3dprintingindustry.com

personalfactory: Automotive industry is heading to very interesting place :) Though it is only the beginning of a long road 3d printing can drastically change the way cars will be manufactured in the future. This is so exciting !